Better With Flowers

Brazilian illustrator and designer Antonio Rodrigues Jr has spelled out several offensive words with a custom typeface made of artificial flowers. Check out the the process on his Behance page

TypeSWAMP 3

Designer Matt Chinworth’s 365 day journal where he experiments with digital and hand-written type. His goal is to create something fresh every single day for a whole year. Above are some examples from the month of February.

(Source: typographyserved.com)

I Don’t Believe in You Either, A Bigfoot Art Show

San Francisco design studio Office conceived, curated, and designed “I Don’t Believe in You Either,” a Bigfoot-inspired art exhibition benefitting 826 Valencia and 826 Boston, the world’s most inspiring nonprofit writing and tutoring centers for kids.

The Office team searched Gold Country, Reno, and the Mission for amazingly awful old landscape paintings, then painted new Bigfoot-inspired art over them, hoping to make the pieces as covetable as they were in their wood-paneled family room heyday. This resulted in a collection of 38 original framed paintings and 100 vintage postcards, as well as a limited edition show poster.

 

(Source: behance.net)

Russ & Daughters

Designer Kelli Anderson recently completed the identity for, Russ and Daughters. Working alongside Jen Snow, the project encompassed everything from the identity to menus and packaging, to signage, wallpaper and the exterior facade.

(Source: designworklife.com)

Franchise Animated

Typefoundry and webshop Animography.net has teamed up with one type designer and 110 animators from various countries to create an interesting animated typeface titled “Franchise Animated”. 

You can download the files containing all keyframe, expressions and artwork from the artists for free at Animography’s website

(Source: designtaxi.com)

The Pothole Project

Chicago artist Jim Bachor latest project has him filling potholes with original tile mosaics. Bachor has filled about 7 potholes with his original artwork that borrows from the design of the Chicago flag. While some of the mosaics simply read POTHOLE others are given unique ID numbers or include the phone number to nearby auto repair shops.

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)